U.S. airman arrested after refusing alcohol test

Okinawa Police stopped 32-year-old SSgt. Anthony Don Bradford, stationed on Kadena Air Base, early Sunday morning, on Hwy 58 in Chatan.

According to police, Bradford was driving at a slow speed when a police patrol stopped him. He was requested to submit to breathalyzer test but he refused.

After Bradford refused to take the test, he was arrested for a road traffic violation. He then said, “I request the presence of MPs.”

  • lostnoone

    LOL!!! arrested for a traffic violation? Seems like the Japanese Police got their little peters hurt over not being about to have their way with him.

    • BlahJU

      It’s pretty standard to get arrested when you refuse a breathalyzer. They do that in the US too.

      • Slumping

        It says he was arrested for a different reason than refusing a test.

        • BlahJU

          Yeah, it says he was arrested for the traffic violation, but that’s because he refused the breathalyzer. This article was translated from a Japanese article, but it would have helped if it had been a bit more clear. Had he not refused the breathalyzer, they would have either given him a ticket and sent him on his way or arrested him for a DUI. The JPs did things by the book here.

  • Dis_log

    A request to JU: Please try to cover full story. for eg. MP came in or not. Is he in custody? Jap/US? If you are translating this news than you should cite the source (AFP etc…) “copyright ethics”. thanks

    • lostnoone

      I don’t think JU is doing the translating. Even if you receive an article with a rough translation, there is a chance to clean it up so a native English speaker can discern what is really going on. One thing I notice is how they tend to quote what somebody said at a given time. Such as…””He then said, “I request the presence of MPs.””. That’s the way I wrote when I was in 3rd grade. You don’t need to quote the guy if it doesn’t even add value to the report.

      • BlahJU

        I’ve done some work with them in the past and yeah, JU does do the translating (stories come from wire services), they just don’t have any native speakers on staff as far as I know. They do have staff that speaks very good English, but as you noticed, it’s not perfect. The translations sometimes come out as pretty literal translations that can seem kind of weird to a native speaker (referring to a driver as a “professional driver”, for example…that’s a Japanese term that doesn’t make much sense for many readers). They could really use a native speaking editor, but I’m not sure if they have the money.

        • Slumping

          I’ll work for JU part time if they want a cheap hire. I have a salary job but would like a hobby.

      • Dis_log

        Well, as long as its understandable it should work in this part of planet and I really appreciate JU for English version. But what I don’t understand is the incomplete news stories written in five sentences. JU is a business with a print version not a twitter blog.
        If you compare it with some paid news with pictures (advertisements news) you will understand what I mean.

        • BlahJU

          I agree it would be nice to have more detailed articles, but I think it’s a trend in Japan to have super concise, to the point, articles. Look at stories in the Ryukyu Shimpo and you’ll see this a lot. (example: http://ryukyushimpo.jp/news/storyid-222276-storytopic-1.html). Many stories are just basically just “this happened” and don’t fully answer the who, what, when, why, and where (or they’ll have one sentence for each). This is what JU has to work with, but sometimes they do have people write original articles (those articles usually have an author listed).

          So, I think it’s more fair to compare JU to other Japanese newspapers. Yeah, this wouldn’t fly in the US, but it’s pretty standard here.

    • lostnoone

      There are very few Japanese who can reliably translate from Japanese to English. Just the same, there are even fewer foreigners who can translate English directly to Japanese. The most reliable resources are the halfies out there who learned Japanese and English.

  • BigEasy01

    They stopped me one night back in the early 90’s for the same thing and hauled me into the Okinawa City cop shop. I just played stupid for quite a few hours then finally let them administer the breathalyzer. By that time I was OK I guess because they turned me loose with my keys. Things have changed, obviously.